Li: ritual, propriety, etiquette. Hsiao: love within the family (parents for children and children for parents. Yi: righteousness--the noblest way to act in a situation. Xin: honesty and trustworthiness. Jen: benevolence, humaneness towards others. Chung: loyalty to the state and authority. --Confucius (Kong Fuzi)

All articles appear in reverse chronological order [newest first]:
I believe the past is relevant, sometimes more than others of course. In most cases we are seeing history being repeated, so it is most relevant.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Get Your Free Checks Here!

by Glenn Littrell

Let’s see:

  • a paycheck or an Unemployment benefits check?
  • security or an Unemployment benefits check?
  • the ability to pay bills or an Unemployment benefits check?
  • the possibility to sustain or return to their normal standard of living or an Unemployment benefits check?
  • living above the poverty level or an Unemployment benefits check?
  • All the above or an Unemployment benefits check?

How can it be so easy to characterize people who have been working for a living as so lazy and lacking of a work ethic that they [and family] would be willing to exchange all of the above for a paltry unemployment check which, even with extensions, is still a short term existence.

It just doesn’t make since to so often portray people who need help as lazy slackers. Does the pitiful UI check make poverty attractive?

image
5 unemployed workers for every job.

Links:

Republicans To Unemployed: Why Won't You All Just Get Some Jobs Already?

Does Unemployment Money Help or Hurt?
Some Real Questions for Chamber’s ‘Jobs Summit’
Lack of Jobs, Not ‘Generous’ UI Benefits, Keep Unemployed Jobless
Progressive Breakfast: Address Unemployment Pain, Or Make It Worse
Who Gets Us Out Of The Hole We Are In?

1 comment:

GlennDL said...

"It is the near-unanimous position of the Republican party, according to GOP leaders, that Bush-era tax cuts that benefit the rich should be extended, without being paid for by spending cuts or tax increases in other areas -- even as they deny unemployment benefits on the grounds that they cost too much. The tax cuts cost almost $700 billion; the unemployment benefits about five percent of that. Some Republicans say tax cuts ought not be paid for because that puts downward pressure on the size of government. Others say, against all evidence, that tax cuts raise revenue." http://tpmdc.talkingpointsmemo.com/2010/07/republicans-pull-back-the-veil-on-their-tax-cutting-deregulating-agenda.php